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Architecture / Sculptures / Statues

Stepwells

Stepwells were quite popular in olden days as they were the source of water for drinking and other household needs. They are known as vav in Gujarati and as Baoli in Rajasthani, and are popular especially in semi-arid regions of Gujarat, Rajasthan.
Source: ahmedabadtourism.in


* 18 March 2022
stepwell at Myllucharlla Village in Chandra Sekhara Puram Mandal in Prakasam District
The 300 year old stepwell at Myllucharlla Village in Chandra Sekhara Puram Mandal in Prakasam District of Andhra Pradesh is considered to be built by the 'Gandi brothers', both cattle farmers, at a place in the Nallamalla forests. It was built in the 17th century and is source of pure drink-ing water within the fluoride affected region.The shape is variously described as diya, horseshoe, shivalinga.
Source:  Parched A.P. village saved by 300-year-old stepwell by S. Murali, The Hindu, April 19, 2018


* 5 March 2022
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Adalaj ni Vav, 15th-century stepwell, representing the Indo-Islamic fusion architecture has intricate carvings on the pillars that support the five storeys. The opening in the ceilings above the landing allows light and air to enter the octagonal well, but direct sunlight never touches the steps except at noon. It is said that the temperature inside the well is six degrees cooler than outside. The stepwell has three entrances. The stairs lead to an underground storey, which has an octagonal opening on top. The walls are covered in ornamental carvings with mythological and village scenes. Some of them include Ami khumbor (a pot that contains the water of life) and the Kalp vriksha (a tree of life) carved out of a single slab of stone. There is a belief that the small frieze of Navagraha (nine-planets) towards the edge of the well protects the monument from bad omens.
Source: gujarattourism.com


* 5 March 2022
Adalaj Ni Vav is in Adalaj village, near Gandhinagar, Gujarat state capital, and about 18 kilometres from Ahmedabad.
Hindu King Rana Veer Singh started construction of the Adalaj ni vav to provide relief to his people in this arid region, who had to walk miles for water. However, before it was finished, he entered into a war with neighboring Muslim King Mehmud Begada. King Rana Veer Singh was killed in battle, and King Mehmud Begada fell in love with his widow, the beautiful Queen Roopba (aka Queen Rudabai).
Queen Roopba agreed to marry King Mehmud Begada-but only on the condition that he finish the stepwell her husband had started. King Mehmud Begada agreed, which is why the stepwell design-built in Solanki style of architecture and adorned with Hindu and Jain images-also shows Islamic influences.
When it was finished, Queen Roopba threw herself in to the well, and died. Apparently, she had no intention of marrying King Mehmud-she just wanted to see her husbandís stepwell finished. Luckily, King Mehmud did not destroy the structure or the Hindu ornamentation, and it remains intact more than 500 years later.
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